Photography and People

Photography for Figma should feel unique, and natural. Avoiding extreme perspective, overly literal visual metaphors, or other such techniques. Instead, represent subjects in ‘real life’ scenarios, and focus on more subtle details. This section provides past examples and guidelines for photography for Figma.

When representing people we should avoid illustration, but can use portraits, text, or icons to do so.

Our use of photography should be limited, and distinctive. For instance, by using colored filters to make photos we use feel more graphic.

Spaces

Try and photograph spaces in an organized and from an uncluttered perspective.

Objects

Favor objects in use, pay attention to their environments, try not to make the scenario feel too artifical looking at composition try to have a balance between the thirds of the frame and avoid overly cluttered images.

Portraits

Photograh the subject in a natural environment. Keep subject prominent and avoid cluttered and distracting backgrounds.

Adjusting Provided Imagery

When provided with photographs we don’t shoot ourselves, but are using in our materials, color treatments are a useful way to make them feel consistent and relevant to Figma.

Representing People

Outside of photography, there are several ways we represent people in our designs. Icons, emoji, chat bubbles, avatars, and UI elements are all acceptable ways to do so.

The choice of a cursor or pen tool to represent a person should also indicate their role as a designer or viewer, or represent the action being taken in a graphic (drawing vs. moving).

Figma Tools

Our user interface iconography is combined with this shape language – forging a close connection to the product in our marketing materials.

Sulki
Hana
Min
Zion
Amari
Luca
Denny
Jamie
Marley
Sean
Jordan
Kendall
Niko
Sang

Figma Brand Assets

Logo files for print and web, and color specifications: Download Brand Assets